Dactyloscopy and Ish

Kia ora,

Did you know that koala fingerprints are almost indistinguishable from human fingerprints? Dactyloscopy activates our powers of observation and attention to detail. Patterns are literally at our fingertips.

Personal Development

Last week's story was Violet the Pilot by Steve Breen and this week's story was Ish by Peter H Reynolds. These stories feature gifted characters and we are sharing our personal reflections and growing understanding of giftedness on Flipgrid. You can support this learning at home by discussing these stories with your child. What does your child have in common with these characters? Every gifted learner is unique, but we are starting to notice some qualities and abilities that the heroes of our stories tend to share.


Talent Development

So far, our main focus has been to get comfortable with sharing who we are and what's important to us - our strengths, our interests, our passions. Over the last fortnight, we have started to shift our focus to understanding what sets talents apart. Our liveliest discussion so far has been on the question:


Te Pātai o te Wiki (Questions of the Week)
  1. Is it a talent to eat 12 hotdogs in 60 seconds?

  2. Are all talents worth developing?

Conceptual Development

We are starting to broaden our understanding of the concept of patterns through visual learning. Earlier this term, when asked to share their ideas about patterns, everyone put the term 'patterns' into Google Image Search and came up with very similar examples. Our progress is clear in the growing variety of our ideas, which you can see in this week's learning showcase.


Learning Showcase

Izák, Jordy, and Altarf shared their ideas about patterns in our Pictures Only challenge on Google Classroom. They did such a good job that if you look carefully, you will see which poster represents which idea:

  1. Patterns can be used as camouflage. - Izák

  2. Patterns can be used to communicate in nature. - Jordy

  3. Patterns can be manmade or natural. - Altarf